Tag: portland

Portland’s Neo Nazis

On the Media has a good interview with Wilamette Week repoter Corey Pein, one of the only journalists (maybe the only journalist) to have interviewed the Portland train stabber before the stabbing (interivews at right-wing demonstrations). He contextualizes the white power movement in Portland, a power center for skinheads dating back to at least the 90s (you may recall if you recently watched Green Room), the KKK before that, and the Oregon territory’s “whites only” status.

Pein describes the attacker as an avowed Nazi eager to commit violence against people of color and antifa activists — a man who had Vinlander tattoos, participated in skinhead forums, and spoke openly about being radicalized in prison. In other words, not a Bernie bro gone bad. He did root for Bernie because of an explicit desire to kill Hillary Clinton, but also presumably wanted to kill Bernie, since he hoped that all Jews (and the wrong sort of Christians) would be sent to the gas chambers. (Not an ironic Nazi. A Nazi.)

The whole interview is worth a listen. It’s 12 minutes.

To the Teen Girl Targeted on the Portland Train

Teen Targeted On Portland Train Thanks Strangers (CNN)

Oh, hon. I know I’m talking to my TV and you can’t hear me, but I am talking anyway. Sad girl, it breaks my heart to hear you say, “They lost their lives because of me and my friend.” They lost their lives because a violent, angry, confused man wanted to kill them. Their last wish, their dying wish, was that you and your friend feel welcome and safe and valued. I want that too. I hope somebody nearer by can tell you. I hope everybody can tell you, over and over, until you have been told enough times that you are able to believe it.


Angela says: It’d be cool if the president said it, or in any way acknowledged it, instead of amplifying the message that she’s a problem.

Romie: I don’t think of us as having a president right now, since the guy elected to the office doesn’t seem to want to take the role on. We’re going to have to fill in as best we can. For instance, although I don’t have the statutory powers, I’m going to do what I can to be president, and to represent all of us and the best of our hopes. Please join me in also being president.